Archive for March 1st, 2018

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Six months ago, when Hurricane Harvey struck Texas, industrial facilities in the state shut down, then reopened a few days later. In doing so, they produced nearly 2,000 tons of “excess emissions”—air pollutants in addition to what was allowed as part of their normal operation.

A study by Indiana University (IU) researchers shows that excess emissions—which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters—can make serious contributions to overall air pollution. Yet excess emissions have not received a lot of attention from researchers or regulators, the study’s authors noted. Only three states—Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma—systematically track and report excess emissions and make the data public.

“These emissions are significant,” said Nikolaos Zirogiannis, a scientist at the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs and an author of the study. “They are a regular feature of the operation of industrial facilities, and a single event lasting from a few hours to a few days can produce a large quantity of emissions.”

They also can have a serious impact. The study includes an analysis that concludes excess emissions in Texas cause approximately $150 million a year in negative health consequences.  People living near these facilities are most at risk for short-term and long-term health impacts and frequently have the least resources to mitigate the impacts of these emissions.

The study, “Understanding Excess Emissions from Industrial Facilities: Evidence from Texas,” has been published online by the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Additional authors are SPEA assistant professor Alex Hollingsworth and associate professor David Konisky.


Read Full Post »