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Posts Tagged ‘southwest workers union’

Tuesday January 26th at 4:30p

Main Plaza (in front of City Hall) — Rally & Press Conference

Two national coalitions, the Energy Action Coalition (EAC) and the Center for Community Change (CCC) join with Southwest Workers Union and local grassroots organizations to call on Mayor Castro to take real steps towards reducing energy consumption and generating good, green jobs for the City. Wearing green hard hats, young leaders of organizations from North Dakota to Florida, Washington to Arizona support the fight against expansion of the South Texas Project, to phase out coal and dirty energy sources, to create a comprehensive free weatherization program for low-income families, to invest in solar energy and for a job creation programs in the green energy sector. (more…)

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The international climate negotiations in Copenhagen begin today, and will continue until December 18th. No time for a full reckoning now of what this means in the big picture, what’s at stake, and what to expect — but since others have done a great job already, at the moment there’s no need to.  Plus, there will be plenty of time for that as the negotiations really get kicking.  For now, whet your appetite on the following posts, primers, and articles: Citizen Sarah’s pick of the pre-COP15 litter.

How to Explain Copenhagen to a Comedian **or just about anyone, really

COP15: From San Anto to Copenhagen, Con Amor by Marisol Cortez, Climate Justice Organizer at the Southwest Worker’s Union

My Road to Copenhagen by Emily Grubert, energy and earth resources graduate student and Daily Texan columnist

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By promoting cleaner energy, cleaner government, cleaner cars, and cleaner air for all Texans, we hope to provide for a healthy place to live and prosper. We are Public Citizen Texas.

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Please join the Energia Mia Coalition
including the Esperanza Center, Southwest Worker’s Union

No Nuclear! Platica Tonight

a discussion with local activists and visiting energy expert Arjun Makhijani

FRIDAY, Dec. 4th – 7pm
at the Esperanza Center (210)228-0201
922 San Pedro Ave, SA, TX 78212

Marisol Cortez

currently works as the climate justice organizer for the Southwest Workers’ Union, where she helps lead a campaign calling for greener, more just energy policy in San Antonio. Born in Corpus Christi and raised in and around San Antonio, Marisol worked with local environmental and EJ networks around the PGA issue, which inspired her to study environmental justice issues as a graduate student at UC Davis. She recently completed her Ph.D. in Cultural Studies at UC Davis, and has returned to San Antonio to hopefully put her knowledge and passion to good use!

Arjun Makhijani

President of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research (IEER), holds a Ph.D. in engineering (specialization: nuclear fusion) from the University of California at Berkeley. He has produced many studies and articles on nuclear fuel cycle related issues. Most recently, Dr. Makhijani has authored Carbon-Free and Nuclear-Free: A Roadmap for U.S. Energy Policy (RDR Books and IEER Press, 2007), the first analysis of a transition to a U.S. economy based completely on renewable energy, without any use of fossil fuels or nuclear power. IEER’s website is: www.ieer.org

Genevieve Rodriguez

is a grassroots community activist and labor organizer who has been working to organize students and young people of color in San Antonio around the nuclear issue. Genevieve works on campaigns addressing multiple issues of labor, poverty, reproductive health/ health care, queer issues, public space & sexism/racism /homophobia. Genevieve’s work includes moving and being moved through music, writing & art. She is part of many organizations including Esperanza Center, Planned Parenthood, LIPS (UTSA feminists) & the broader progressive, mujerista, music, and art communities.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON NUCLEAR POWER, visit:

www.energiamia.org

www.nukefreetexas.org

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By promoting cleaner energy, cleaner government, cleaner cars, and cleaner air for all Texans, we hope to provide for a healthy place to live and prosper. We are Public Citizen Texas.

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miaAs many of you already know, the nuclear battle is getting pretty heated in San Antonio these days.  That’s why a new citizen’s group, Energía Mía, has recently formed.  But they can tell you their intentions better than I can:

Citizens are uniting in efforts to halt CPS’ spending for more nuclear reactors. Speakers from many diverse organizations and businesses relayed their concerns about nuclear power as part of the newly formed Energia Mia network and are working to increase visibility and awareness of the problems of nuclear power.

“Energía Mía urges all citizens in San Antonio to get involved now and contact the mayor and city council. The rate hikes that would come from more nuclear power are unacceptable. They would create a severe economic hardship on many people and local businesses” said Cindy Weehler. “We have set up a new web site, www.EnergiaMia.org to provide information to the public and let people know how to get involved.”

According to the San Antonio Express-News, their membership includes representatives from

…the Southwest Workers Union, Project Verde, Alamo Group of the Sierra Club, Highland Hills Neighborhood Association, Jefferson Heights Neighborhood Association, Texas Drought Project, Green Party and the San Antonio Area Progressive Action Coalition.

Alongside fundamental concerns about water, security, radioactive waste, and health and safety risks, the group is concerned about the financial effect the project could have on the city and the rate hikes that CPS has said will accompany STP’s expansion.  CPS has already said that 5-8% rate hikes will be needed every two years for the next ten years to pay for this project, and that electric rates could increase nearly 50% as a result.

The good news is that all the noise these activists are making is starting to have an impact.  Already, Mayor Julian Castro is having doubts.  And apparently, “at every public meeting, city and CPS officials have run into a buzz saw of objections from ratepayers and business owners concerned about higher energy costs.” Some folks are even calling for a referendum on the issue — or at the very least, an honest debate and presentation of viable alternatives (that won’t cost $100 dollars a head).

Way to rouse that rabble, San Antonio.  You deserve answers, and for your concerns to be heard in a meaningful way.  If you agree with these folks (and if you’re a regular reader I bet you do!), sign their petition!

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